Br. Maxwell

Br. Maxwell Klug, OFM, studying for the priesthood at Catholic Theological Union in Chicago.

 

Questions to ask yourself in helping to discern God’s call to the Franciscan life.

Are you considering how God is calling you to religious life? Are you attracted to fraternal life as A Franciscan?

Here are some things to prayerfully consider:

  • Fundamentally, you must have the desire to serve Jesus Christ in a committed and unselfish way.
  • Reside amicably in community in fraternity with men who desire to live the Gospel life in the Franciscan tradition
  • The vows of poverty, chastity and obedience that enable one to fully serve God’s people naturally flow from the demands of this type of life.

Here are some questions to prompt serious consideration of your own special gifts, talents, hopes and expectations.

Is this life for me?

Are you a man who is:

  • A single, practicing Catholic between 21-40 years of age?
  • Debt free, or mostly debt free of any financial obligation?
  • A legal permanent resident of the United States?
  • Able to live a chaste and celibate life?

Must Be a United States Citizen or Permanent Legal Resident

Is this community for me?

I remember sorting things out when I was in my younger 20’s. A tough time, with so many choices. But I am grateful for those choices, and for the choice I made. Recognizing and accepting your gifts, and looking outside yourself to a world in need, is a good way to begin discerning how and where to serve.

What do you hope to share with and through us?

Feel free to contact Fr. Greg to explore how your gifts and talents might be put to Franciscan service in our ministries. Or, if you happen to live near one of ministries, we invite you to contact a local Friar.

Formation Process

Becoming a Franciscan involves several years of discernment and formation.

  • The initial stage is known as Postulancy. This year is devoted to experiencing fraternal life with some opportunity to participate in ministry and takes place in Silver Spring, MD. The postulant program, depending on your discernment, can be from one to two years. 
  • The second year, called the novitiate, focuses on an intense introduction to the spiritual life and the life of the vows. The novitiate is at Mission Santa Barbara in Santa Barbara, California. It concludes with the novices taking vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience for one year. 
  • The post-novitiate (sometimes referred to as the period of temporary profession until a permanent profession is made) takes place in Chicago, and concludes the initial formation of the Franciscan. During this period the friar’s spiritual and intellectual formation continues. The friar and the fraternity reflect on his experience of living the vows and serving the People of God. For those seeking ordination to the priesthood, classes are taken at Catholic Theological Union. For those wishing to serve the Church as Franciscan lay brothers, a good understanding of Catholicism is provided, and an opportunity to develop a skill that one already has (such as mechanics, cooking, tailoring – the list is immense!)  or one would wish to learn is made available.
  • Usually after three years, the friar takes the solemn vows of poverty, chastity and obedience. During the period of post-novitiate formation, the candidate receives professional training in an area of ministry. Those preparing for the Priesthood attend Catholic Theological Union in Chicago.